Category Archives: Corvus

Corvus hardisk file transfer:

front_s

I got this super interesting 20MB hardrive made by CORVUS earlier this year among other Apple II and /// hardware. These things were really expensive and reasonably rare specially over here in the Nordic region.

psu_s

What was nice that it was 50/60HZ 120V/240V so no need for power converters.

fuse_s

The fuse holder had interesting options from 100 up to 240V.

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Inside view.

 

back_s

Backside view. These can be attached to VCR or an another Corvus unit etc.

There’s lots of switches so first thing first, i looked for manual how to check all the dip switches and switches under the front panel…. at this time i was only intereted what data was on it, if any, and if it actually would work.

The actual data rescue:

This is how i did it. There might be better ways but this is how i got the files out of there. I could have imaged the disk maybe, with ADTpro, but i did want to play around with Pascal, the Corvus software and the Booti-card this time.

-Corvus HDD 20MB with Corvus-interface card in Slot #4
-Booti-card in Slot #2 with USB memory, ProDOS 16MB hdd-image with pre-made folders.

-Boot floppy: “Corvus Utilities for Apple ///”  (had .CORVUS drivers, added .PROFILE .PB3 by Robert Justice) and then Apple /// Pascal disk 1 as it’s Pascal based software.

corvus-hdd-volumes

Just basicly executed the  : VMGR.CODE (Corvus Volume Manager).
-The drive had Pascal volumes on disk that needs to be mounted first. Size can be anything no limits.
-Listed the volumes
-Mounted volume to #x (x = number) i.e. /LASSE

-Filer > Transfer
– /LASSE/=, /USB/= (choose all files from folder and copy).

 

Data and documents:

What were there? Lots of documents about “Sagobyn” (i had to look it up what it was) as well private letters to Lindgren family members. At first i thought these were written by world famous author, Astrid Lindgren herself, but after taking closer look they were actually written by Lena Törnqvist during 1988-1990. Lena Törnqvist is a Swedish literary scholar and librarian, who until 2006 was curator at the Astrid Lindgren Museum.

Sagobyn:
“The idea of creating a ‘story village’ with settings from Astrid Lindgren’s books originally came from the Isaksson,  Jalminger and Soowik families in Vimmerby. In 1981, they built the first house together, Katthult, on a 1:3 scale. Over the years, more settings were added to Sagobyn (the story village), as it was then called, all built on a 1:3 scale. In time, the facility became too big for the three families to manage and they sold Sagobyn in 1989. The change in owner led to the creation of a new company – Astrid Lindgrens Värld AB. Since January 2010, Astrid Lindgren’s World has been owned jointly by Astrid Lindgren Förvaltning AB (91%) and the Municipality of Vimmerby (9%).

We can confirm that when we closed the gates for the 2018 season, Astrid Lindgren’s World had had 10,542,842 visitors from the start of 1981 to today.”

Astrid Lindgren:
“Astrid Anna Emilia Lindgren, 14 November 1907 – 28 January 2002) was a Swedish writer of fiction and screenplays. She is best known for several children’s book series, featuring Pippi Longstocking, Emil i Lönneberga, Karlsson-on-the-Roof, and the Six Bullerby Children (Children of Noisy Village in the US), and for the children’s fantasy novels Mio, My Son, Ronia the Robber’s Daughter, and The Brothers Lionheart. Lindgren worked on the Children’s Literature Editorial Board at the Rabén & Sjögren publishing house in Stockholm and wrote more than 30 books for children.[4] In January 2017, she was calculated to be the world’s 18th most translated author,[5] and the fourth most translated children’s writer after Enid Blyton, Hans Christian Andersen and the Brothers Grimm. Lindgren has so far sold roughly 165 million books worldwide. In 1994, she was awarded the Right Livelihood Award for “her unique authorship dedicated to the rights of children and respect for their individuality.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astrid_Lindgren

These files were delivered to Lena Törnqvist/Astrid Lindgren museum.

FinApple 2020 (c)
Apple /// Forever.